Could Women Use Smaller Vaccine Doses?

The decision to vaccinate is a personal one. Do your own research and weigh the side effects and disease risks against the benefits of the vaccine. Keep in mind that those who are immuno-compromised, weak or frail are in a higher risk group than healthy young and middle aged adults. The authors of this NY Time's Op-Ed piece contend that clinical studies are showing that women produce as many antibodies to half the dose of flu vaccine that men do at the full dose, and that the rule holds up for other diseases such as measles, mumps, rubella, hepatitis A & B and herpes simplex. If women were given a lower dose they might suffer fewer side effects than they do at the higher dose. In the…

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Health Reform?

Why is it ok to have mandatory auto insurance and mandatory flood insurance but those who are against health care reform think it's not ok to require mandatory health insurance to ensure that everyone has access to affordable health care? And why is it that those who are against universal health care are the one's who already have health insurance? KB

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Should Junk Food Be Sin-Taxed?

Let me take this opportunity to discuss the proposed surtax on soft drinks to help pay the costs of universal health care. First off, I'm for it, and here's why:If we go to a universal health care plan, that would mean that we are all in the same insurance pool: we all put money in, and the sick and infirm take money out as needed to provide for their health care. That means that those of us who do preventative care, live a healthy lifestyle and cultivate our health are subsidizing the health care expenses of those who do not take care of their health. Obesity is at epidemic proportions in this country, and has been for some years. The costs of obesity in terms of disease…

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On the Hidden/Real Costs of Healthcare/Insurance: NY Times Article

I avoid getting political in matters relating to my practice, which would include on this blog. In the case of universal health care, the political relates to my practice, and I find myself no longer able to restrain my urge to speak out.I suppose first off I should straight out say that I am emphatically for universal health care because it is the humane and compassionate thing to do. With the advances in western medical technology causing health care costs to rise astronomically, I can not see any reason why the so called 'most advanced nation on earth' does not provide health care/insurance for all members of it's society. The notion of not providing health care to all, and rather only providing it to the 'haves', is…

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Mahatma Gandhi Kitcharee: Rice & Grain Dish Works Well for Poor Appetite

In TCM (Traditional Chinese Medicine) we often prescribe a rice porridge called congee for those with poor appetite or difficult digestion, esp. for chronic illness, cancer or chemotherapy. Congees are traditionally made with rice, although any grain can be uses. They are cooked with lots of water (8:1 water: rice) and cooked for a long time (4-8hr: a crock pot is often used). Herbs, meats, dried fruits, sweeteners and nuts are added for flavor and medicinal effect. A respected teacher of mine gave accounts of bedridden patients with cancer brought back from the precipice through the use of congee.In India, they make a traditional dish called kitcharee, which is similar to the medicinal effect of congee, but less water and cooking time is involved. Kitcharee works well…

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Dangers of Using Cellphone While Driving, NY Times Article

The New York Times is running a series on the dangers of using cellphones while driving. This article tells the heart wrenching story of a young man who caused a deadly auto accident because he never saw the red light while engaged in a cell phone conversation.According to the NY Times research, studies show cell phone drivers have an equal crash risks as a drunk driver. The article cites a 2003 Harvard study asserting that "cellphone distractions caused 2,600 traffic deaths every year, and 330,000 accidents that results in moderate or severe injuries." "Five states and the District of Columbia require drivers who talk on cellphones to use hands-free devices, but research shows that using headsets can be as dangerous as holding a phone because the conversation…

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Michael Jackson 1958-2009, RIP

MJ's death has affected me on a deep level. This grief caught me by surprise. In reflection, I've remembered that MJ was my first pre-teen heart-throb, and I didn't realize that I had kept a place for him tucked away in my heart all these years. Throughout his magnificent 40 year career I have maintained tremendous respect & admiration of him as one of the great entertainers of out time. More than his music, I think my continued connection to him was in his dancing and his showmanship.Last nite I went back on YouTube and watched a number of live performances not included in the weekend video marathon on all of the music channels (there were times this weekend when 5 channels were simultaneously running a marathon…

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The Importance of Being Rested

I am researching lymphoma, a type of cancer. One of the books I am reading discusses the importance of getting enough rest. This issue cannot be overstated, not only for cancer treatment, but for any type of disease or injury prevention.Getting adequate rest includes resting during an illness, rather than trying to work through it. Overwork impairs detoxification, so that the chemical toxins we are exposed to in our environment accumulate in the body. The build up of toxins can lead not only to cancer formation, but atopic (allergic) and autoimmune conditions.Sleep is essential for detoxification and for the release of growth hormone needed to repair & rebuild damaged tissues.Poor or lack of sleep leads to yin deficiency. Yin deficiency is a TCM (Traditional Chinese Medicine) concept.…

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Maintaining Inner Peace to Provide Certainty During Uncertain Times

I noticed this piece, What You Don't Know Makes You Nervous, on the cause of anxiety in the Op/Ed of the NY Times this morning. In it, Daniel Gilbert shows that people are happier with certainty, and that uncertainty is the cause unhappiness. To make his point, Gilbert cites studies showing that faced with the certainty verses the uncertainty of an unfortunate circumstance, such as a chronic disease condition, those with certainty of the unfortunate event were less nervous than those for whom the predictability of the event is uncertain. In other words, it is the the 'not knowing' that causes mental unrest, not the actual event.Gilbert relates this information to the uncertain economic times we live in. People have a lot of fear about their economic…

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